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Glacier Bay Lodge in Glacier Bay National Park in Alaska


Glacier Bay Lodge in Glacier Bay National Park in Alaska

Nestled under the spruce trees that line Bartlett Cove, Glacier Bay Lodge offers the only hotel accommodations within the park. The Lodge offers magnificent sunset views of the Fairweather Mountain range. Directly from the Lodge take a full-day tour of the West Arm of Glacier Bay where you'll come face-to-face with Grand Pacific and Margerie Glaciers and make your Alaska vacation a memorable one. 
   

     
Here you'll enjoy cozy hotel room accommodations among the Sitka Spruce trees and relax in the warmth of the lobby's massive stone fireplace. You'll take in awesome views of the water and Fairweather Range, learn about the area's natural history from fascinating interpretive displays and savor delightful meals - including fresh-caught local seafood on your great Alaska vacation. And at day's end, you'll sleep peacefully in your comfortable room, surrounded by the quiet of Alaska’s northern rainforest. The rustic and cozy guest hotel rooms are accessible from the Lodge lobby by boardwalks.
  

   Glacier Bay LodgeGlacier Bay Lodge and  a nice warm fire
  

Glacier Bay Lodge Backcountry Camping
Free permits are required for both the Glacier Bay campground and Glacier Bay backcountry from May 1 through September 30. To get your permit and a bear resistant food container, campers must attend a 30-minute orientation offered by request at the Bartlett Cove Visitor Information Station. Reservations are not required.

  
Glacier Bay BearsGlacier Bay National Park Whale
 

History of Glacier Bay National Park
Glacier Bay was first surveyed in 1794 by a team from the H.M.S. Discovery, captained by George Vancouver. At that time, the survey showed a mere indentation in the shoreline. The massive glacier was more than 4,000 feet thick in places, up to 20 miles wide, and extended more than 100 miles to the St. Elias mountain range. By 1879, however, naturalist John Muir discovered that the ice had retreated more than 30 miles forming an actual bay. By 1916, the Grand Pacific Glacier – the main glacier credited with carving the bay – had melted back 60 miles to the head of what is now Tarr Inlet.

  
Glacier Bay National ParkJohn Muir in Glacier Bay National Park

Efforts for protecting Glacier Bay were made by John Muir and other conservationists, and in 1925 President Calvin Coolidge signed a proclamation creating Glacier Bay National Monument. At the time, the monument contained less than half the area of the present park. In 1980, the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act elevated the monument to national park status and also extended the park boundary northwest to the Alsek River and Dry Bay.
 
Further protection and recognition of Glacier Bay's significance occurred in 1986, when the Glacier Bay-Admiralty Island Biosphere Reserve was established under the United Nations Biosphere Program. In 1992 Glacier Bay became part of an international World Heritage Site.
 
Glacier Bay National Park includes numerous tidewater glaciers -several are actively calving icebergs into the bay. The show can be spectacular. As water undermines the ice fronts, great blocks of ice - up to 200 feet high - break loose and crash into the water. The Johns Hopkins Glacier calves such enormous volumes of ice that it is rarely safe to get within two miles of its cliffs.
 

Information
Glacier Bay Lodge
179 Bartlett Cove
Gustavus, AK 99826
Phone: 888.229.8687
Website: www.visitglacierbay.com 

 

 

 

 













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